Tag Archives: influenza vaccine

CDC’s 2016 National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is scheduled for December 4-10, 2016.  The CDC established National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) in 2005 to raise public awareness about the importance of flu vaccination.  The 2016 national awareness week focuses on highlighting the importance of influenza vaccination and continuing flu vaccination through the holiday season and beyond.  To learn more about what is new for the 2016-2017 flu season, view the CDC’s Factsheet by clicking HERE.

It's National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW)! Did you know that flu season can begin as early as October, it usually peaks between December and February, and it can last as late as May? As long as flu virsues are spreading, it's not too late to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones through fall, winter and into spring. #GetAFluVax

NIVW Timing

Flu vaccination coverage estimates from past years have shown that influenza vaccination activity drops quickly after the end of November.

CDC and its partners choose to December for NIVW to remind people that even though the holiday season has arrived, it is not too late to get your flu vaccine.  As long as flu viruses are spreading and causing illness, vaccination can provide protection against the influenza virus and should continue.

Even if you haven’t yet received a vaccine and have already gotten sick with one flu virus, you can still benefit from vaccination since the flu vaccine protects against three or four different flu viruses (depending on which flu vaccine you get).

Flu Vaccination for People at High Risk

Another goal of NIVW is to communicate the importance of flu vaccination for people who are at high risk for developing flu-related complications.  People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, and people aged 65 years and older.  For people at high risk, getting the flu can mean developing serious flu-related complications, like pneumonia, or a worsening of existing health conditions, which can lead to hospitalization or death.

For more information about how Sentry’s proven vaccine management system can protect your vaccine throughout the global supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

To contact CDC by phone call (800) 232-4636 (800-CDC-INFO) or visit the website at

www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw .

New CDC Study: Influenza Vaccination Reduces Risk of Hospitalization by More Than Half Among Seniors

Influenza season is upon us, so now is an appropriate time to remind ourselves to line up for our flu shots.  Sentry BioPharma Services provides vaccine product management services to a wide group of clients from the US Federal and State government agencies to vaccine manufacturers, with an emphasis on timely delivery of vital vaccines globally.

Recently, the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) published a study on the beneficial effects of influenza vaccines on older populations within the USA.  We have provided an overview of the study below for your review and consideration.shutterstock_351328199

August 2, 2016—A new CDC study published today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID) provides more evidence on the benefits of flu vaccination among older adults. The study looked at flu-associated hospitalizations among people 50 and older during the 2010-2011 flu season and found that people who had received a flu vaccine reduced their risk of flu-associated hospitalization by half.

People 65 and older are at high risk of serious flu complications and account for the majority of flu hospitalizations and deaths each year. The CID study “Case-control study of vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations in older adults, United States, 2010-11,” cites data from three recent influenza seasons, during which an estimated 115,000 to 630,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 to 27,000 deaths occurred. It’s estimated that people 65 and older accounted for between 54 percent and 71 percent of hospitalizations and between 71 percent and 85 percent of deaths.

The study, which compared 368 flu-hospitalized patients and compared them against case controls selected from the community, found that vaccinated people 50 years and older were 57 percent less likely to be hospitalized from flu than unvaccinated people. The benefits were similar by age group, including adults 75 years and older. This is a notable finding since flu effectiveness studies that have looked at how well vaccine protects against flu-related doctor’s visits have generally found that effectiveness is declines with age. This study indicates that protection against hospitalization was level among older people.

Annual influenza vaccination has been recommended for adults 65 and older in the U.S. since the 1960s and for adults 50 years and older since 2000. Since 2005, CDC has conducted annual influenza vaccine effectiveness studies to assess how well the vaccine works in preventing medically attended illness. Until recently, there have been few studies that look at how well the vaccine works in preventing more serious outcomes, like hospitalization. The CID study adds to a growing body of evidence that supports the importance of vaccination in order to prevent these more serious outcomes.

Study findings also support current U.S. recommendations for annual influenza vaccination among adults, especially among adults 65 years of age and older who are at high risk of influenza-associated complications. During 2015-2016, an estimated 66% of people 65 and older got a flu vaccine. While this is the highest vaccination rate among the public for any age group, that still leaves nearly one-third of people 65 and older unvaccinated.

Secure GMP storage and flu vaccine distribution services protect your refrigerated inventory throughout the temperature-controlled supply chain.  For more information about how Sentry’s vaccine storage and proven vaccine management system can protect your vaccine throughout the pharmaceutical global supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

FDA Releases Flu Vaccine Lots for the 2016-2017 Season

Cumulative 2016/2017 Season Lot Release Status (Updated 8/3/2016)

Flu vaccine lots that have been released by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and are available for national distribution by the vaccine manufacturers.

Manufacturer Total Number of Lots Released by FDA
Afluria – Seqirus Pty. Ltd. 19
Fluad – Seqirus, Inc. 0
Fluarix Quadrivalent – GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals 23
Flublok – Protein Sciences Corporation 0
Flucelvax Quadrivalent – Seqirus, Inc. 0
FluLaval Quadrivalent – ID Biomedical Corporation of Quebec 3
FluMist Quadrivalent – MedImmune, LLC 3
Fluvirin – Seqirus Vaccines Limited 9
Fluzone High Dose – Sanofi Pasteur, Inc. 2
Fluzone Quadrivalent – Sanofi Pasteur, Inc. 14

FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) met in Silver vials_v1Spring, Maryland, on March 4, 2016, to select the influenza viruses for the composition of the influenza vaccine for the 2016-2017 U.S. influenza season. During this meeting, the advisory committee reviewed and evaluated the surveillance data related to epidemiology and antigenic characteristics of recent influenza isolates, serological responses to 2015-2016 vaccines, and the availability of candidate strains and reagents.

The committee recommended that the trivalent formulation influenza vaccines for the U.S. 2016-2017 influenza season contain the following:

  • an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like virus;
  • an A/Hong Kong /4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus (B/Victoria lineage).

The committee also recommended that quadrivalent influenza vaccines contain the above three strains and the following additional B strain:

  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus (B/Yamagata lineage)

Secure GMP storage and flu vaccine distribution services protect your refrigerated inventory throughout the temperature-controlled supply chain.  For more information about how Sentry’s vaccine storage and proven vaccine management system can protect your vaccine throughout the global supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

For information on seasonal flu vaccine distribution schedules, please contact the manufacturers listed in the table above directly.

The CDC & Sentry Gear Up for the 2016 Flu Season

Even though nearly half of the United States (U.S.) population gets a flu vaccine annually, the impact of influenza remains high. According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), the flu costs the U.S. more than $87 billion annually and is responsible for the loss of close to 17 million workdays each flu season. Tens of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands die from flu-related illnesses each year in the U.S.

Sentry BioPharma Services gears up for the 2016 flu season by promoting three strategies to combat illness:

  1. Get the 2016 flu vaccine.
  2. Exercise good health habits.
  3. See your doctor for an antiviral medication to treat the flu if you get sick.

August 29, 2013, Atlanta, GA - Chris Summerrow (left), Director of Business and Continuity Management, UPS, speaks with Dr. Ali Khan, Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, in the Emergency Operations Center at the CDC.

Flu Vaccine Facts

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Trivalent vaccines are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. Quadrivalent vaccines protect against four viruses; the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine as well as an additional B virus.

Flu vaccines CANNOT cause the flu. Flu vaccines are made with either killed or weakened viruses.

Flu vaccines are safe. Serious problems from the flu vaccine are very rare. The most common side effect that a person is likely to experience is either soreness at the injection site, or runny nose in the case of nasal spray. These side effects are generally mild and usually go away after a day or two. Visit Influenza Vaccine Safety for more information.

Can the flu be treated?

Yes. There are prescription medications called “antiviral drugs” that can be used to treat influenza illness.

What are antiviral drugs?

Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid, an inhaled powder, or an intravenous solution) that fight against the flu in your body. Antiviral drugs are not sold over-the-counter. You can only get them if you have a prescription from your doctor or health care provider. Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics, which fight against bacterial infections.

What should I do if I think I have the flu?

If you get the flu, antiviral drugs are a treatment option. Check with your doctor promptly if you have a high risk condition and you get flu symptoms. Flu symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Your doctor may prescribe antiviral drugs to treat your flu illness.

Should I still get a flu vaccine?

Yes. Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense to treat the flu if you get sick. A flu vaccine is still the first and best way to prevent influenza.

What are the benefits of antiviral drugs?

When used for treatment, antiviral drugs can lessen symptoms and shorten the time you are sick by 1 or 2 days. They also can prevent serious flu complications, like pneumonia. For people with a high risk medical condition, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having milder illness instead of very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

What are the possible side effects of antiviral drugs?

Some side effects have been associated with the use of flu antiviral drugs, including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, runny or stuffy nose, cough, diarrhea, headache and some behavioral side effects. These are uncommon. Your doctor can give you more information about these drugs or you can check the CDC or the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites.

When should antiviral drugs be taken for treatment?

Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick. However, starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high risk health condition or is very sick from the flu. Follow instructions for taking these drugs.

What antiviral drugs are recommended this flu season?

There are three FDA-approved influenza antiviral drugs recommended by CDC this season to treat influenza. The brand names for these are Tamiflu® (generic name oseltamivir), Relenza® (generic name zanamivir), and Rapivab® (generic name peramivir). Tamiflu® is available as a pill or liquid and Relenza® is a powder that is inhaled. (Relenza® is not for people with breathing problems like asthma or COPD, for example.) Rapivab® is administered intravenously by a health care provider.

How long should antiviral drugs be taken?

To treat the flu, Tamiflu® and Relenza® are usually prescribed for 5 days, although people hospitalized with the flu may need the medicine for longer than 5 days. Rapivab® is administered intravenously for 15 to 30 minutes.

Secure GMP storage and flu vaccine distribution services protect your refrigerated inventory throughout the temperature-controlled supply chain.  For more information about how Sentry’s vaccine storage and proven vaccine management system can protect your vaccine throughout the global supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.