Tag Archives: cancer research

Sentry team to participate in the 2019 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure ®

This Saturday, April 27th, 2019 several Sentry BioPharma Services team members will be proudly participating in the 2019 Komen Central Indiana Race for the Cure ®. 

Over the years this event has raised more than $2 billion dollars to help fund research, education, screening and treatment.  This event is unique in that 100% of the net proceeds are invested in the Komen mission.  25% of all funds go towards research to learn about the biology of breast cancer, advance new screening technologies, develop better treatment protocols and combat metastatic disease.  The remaining 75% is invested in locally through a community grants program.  Last year $697,047 was invested in 9 local breast health programs and provide 40,000 services within a 41-county service area in Indiana.

Our team realizes that fundraising is critical to helping breast cancer patients living right here in central Indiana.  These sobering statistics from the Central Indiana Susan G. Komen website help to bring that need even more into focus.

  • 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.
  • Every 19 seconds, somewhere in the world, a case of breast cancer is diagnosed.
  • Every 60 seconds, somewhere in the world, someone dies from breast cancer.
  • Every 13 minutes, one woman in the U.S will lose her life to breast cancer.
  • At the current rate, 13 million breast cancer deaths will occur around the world in the next 25 years.

Sentry is determined to take action and this event is our chance to support the Komen organization in its efforts to end breast cancer forever. 

For more info on how you can help please visit the Susan G. Komen® website.

Bring Your Brave: Breast Cancer Awareness Month Begins Today!

braveDid you know that one in eight women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime?  At that current rate, that means 13 million breast cancer deaths around the world will occur in the next 25 years.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being female) and age (growing older).  Other factors can be changed by making choices. By choosing the healthiest lifestyle options possible, you can empower yourself and make sure your breast cancer risk is as low as possible.

Reduce Risk Factors:

  • Do not smoke
  • Drink alcohol in moderation
  • Exercise at least three hours per week or about 30 minutes a day
  • Eat a nutritious, low-fat diet (30 grams or less) with plenty of fruits and green and orange vegetables

The National Breast Cancer Foundation launches the annual campaign by raising awareness during the month of October.  The endeavor begins today, October 1, 2016 and lasts through the end of the month.  Getting a high-quality screening mammogram and having a clinical breast exam on a regular basis are the most effective ways to detect breast cancer early.

Early Detection Strategies:

  1. Recognize signs & symptoms
  2. Perform a monthly breast self-exam (BSE)
  3. Have an annual clinical breast exam
  4. Screen for abnormalities with a mammogram

The American College of Radiology (ACR) has established a uniform way for radiologists to describe mammogram findings. The system, called BI-RADS, includes seven standardized categories, or levels. Each BI-RADS category has a follow-up plan associated with it to help radiologists and other physicians appropriately manage a patient’s care.

bi-rads

Some state and local health programs and employers provide mammograms free or at low cost. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) coordinates the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. This program provides screening services, including clinical breast exams and mammograms, to low-income, uninsured women throughout the United States and in several U.S. territories. Contact information for local programs is available on the CDC website or by calling 1–800–CDC–INFO (1–800–232–4636).

Information about free or low-cost mammography screening programs is also available from the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Cancer Information Service at 1–800–4–CANCER (1–800–422–6237) and from local hospitals, health departments, women’s centers, or other community groups.

For more information:

FDA Removes Clinical Hold on Phase II of Juno’s “ROCKET” Trial

On Tuesday, July 12, 2016, Juno Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing cell-based cancer immunotherapies headquartered in Seattle, Washington, announced on the company’s website that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed the clinical hold on the Phase II clinical trial of JCAR015 (known as the “ROCKET” trial) in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL).  Under the revised protocol, the ROCKET trial will continue enrollment using JCAR015 with cyclophosphamide pre-conditioning only.

CAR-T

Earlier this month Juno received notice from the (FDA) that a clinical trial hold has been placed on the pivotal clinical trial of JCAR015.  This Phase II clinical trial, also known as the “ROCKET” trial, was being conducted in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL).  As of last Friday, a total of three deaths have occurred in adult patients during clinical trials.

According to an article published by FierceBiotech on July 8, 2016, “All three deaths were in young patients, all under the age of 25, and all were due to cerebral edema.  All three of these patients were also on a preconditioning regimen of fludarabine.”

While this “living drug” may offer cancer patients a possible option where none previously existed, it is uncertain as to whether or not the class of chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) treatments poses safety issues.  This new technology focuses on re-engaging a patient’s own immune system (T cells) via genetically engineering to recognize the antigen and kill cancerous cells.  One big question is:  Can this be done in conjunction with standard leukemia chemotherapy drugs like fludarabine and cyclophosphamide?

The removal of the clinical hold suggests that the FDA appears to satisfied with Juno’s response in addressing worrisome side effect and safety concerns resulting from the reaction between JCAR015 and the chemotherapy drug fludarabine.

Phase I of the JCAR015 study had a “complete response rate” (i.e., detectable cancer did not appear present after treatment), this cancer treatment offers much promise and hope to individuals and families battling this devastating and too often fatal disease.

For more information about how Sentry can implement a custom solution to provide GMP storage for clinical trial materials and/or meet your unique biopharmaceutical supply chain challenges, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400, for a complimentary, no obligation phone call with one of Sentry’s problem-solving experts.

NIH: Increased Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk of 13 Types of Cancer

Sentry BioPharma Services provides oncology product management, global drug distribution, GMP storage and specialized services like pharmaceutical labeling, packaging and kitting.  Sentry plays a critical role in protecting temperature-sensitive product safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) for both cancer clinical trials and commercial drug distribution for a wide range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients.  With this in mind, the most successful cancer drugs are no match for avoidance of cancer altogether.  Therefore, we are sharing this article from the National Institute for Health (NIH) concerning a new study which links physical exercise with lower cancer rates. 

A new study of the relationship between physical activity and cancer has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer. The risk of developing seven cancer types was 20 percent (or more) lower among the most active participants (90th percentile of activity) as compared with the least active participants (10th percentile of activity). These findings, from researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the NIH, and the American Cancer Society (ACS), confirm and extend the evidence for a benefit of physical activity on cancer risk and support its role as a key component of population-wide cancer prevention and control efforts. The study, by Steven C. Moore, Ph.D., NCI, and colleagues, appeared May 16, 2016, in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Hundreds of previous studies have examined associations between physical activity and cancer risk and shown reduced risks for colon, breast, and endometrial cancers; however, results have been inconclusive for most cancer types due to small numbers of participants in the studies. This new study pooled data on 1.44 million people, ages 19 to 98, from the United States and Europe, and was able to examine a broad range of cancers, including rare malignancies. Participants were followed for a median of 11 years during which 187,000 new cases of cancer occurred.

The investigators confirmed that leisure-time physical activity, as assessed by self-reported shutterstock_426808351surveys, was associated with a lower risk of colon, breast, and endometrial cancers. They also determined that leisure-time physical activity was associated with a lower risk of 10 additional cancers, with the greatest risk reductions for esophageal adenocarcinoma, liver cancer, cancer of the gastric cardia, kidney cancer, and myeloid leukemia. Myeloma and cancers of the head and neck, rectum, and bladder also showed reduced risks that were significant, but not as strong. Risk was reduced for lung cancer, but only for current and former smokers; the reasons for this are still being studied.

“Leisure-time physical activity is known to reduce risks of heart disease and risk of death from all causes, and our study demonstrates that it is also associated with lower risks of many types of cancer,” said Moore. “Furthermore, our results support that these associations are broadly generalizable to different populations, including people who are overweight or obese, or those with a history of smoking. Health care professionals counseling inactive adults should promote physical activity as a component of a healthy lifestyle and cancer prevention.”

Leisure-time physical activity is defined as exercise done at one’s own discretion, often to improve or maintain fitness or health. Examples include walking, running, swimming, and other moderate to vigorous intensity activities. The median level of activity in the study was about 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity per week, which is comparable to the current recommended minimum level of physical activity for the U.S. population.

There are a number of mechanisms through which physical activity could affect cancer risk. It has been hypothesized that cancer growth could be initiated or abetted by three metabolic pathways that are also affected by exercise: sex steroids (estrogens and androgens); insulin and insulin-like growth factors; and proteins involved with both insulin metabolism and inflammation. Additionally, several non-hormonal mechanisms have been hypothesized to link physical activity to cancer risk, including inflammation, immune function, oxidative stress, and, for colon cancer, a reduction in time that it takes for waste to pass through the gastrointestinal tract.

Most associations between physical activity and lower cancer risk changed little when adjusted for body mass index, suggesting that physical activity acts through mechanisms other than lowering body weight to reduce cancer risk. Associations between physical activity and cancer were also similar in subgroups of normal weight and overweight participants, and in current smokers or people who never smoked.

The study was a large-scale effort of the Physical Activity Collaboration of NCI’s Cohort Consortium, which was formed to estimate physical activity and disease associations using pooled prospective data and a standardized analytical approach.

“For years, we’ve had substantial evidence supporting a role for physical activity in three leading cancers: colon, breast, and endometrial cancers, which together account for nearly one in four cancers in the United States,” said Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., a co-author from the American Cancer Society. “This study linking physical activity to 10 additional cancers shows its impact may be even more relevant, and that physical activity has far reaching value for cancer prevention.”

The National Cancer Institute leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at https://www.cancer.gov or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

Reference

Moore SC, et al. Leisure-time physical activity and risk of 26 types of cancer in 1.44 million adults. JAMA Internal Medicine. May 16, 2016. DOI:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1548.

Sentry BioPharma Services offers temperature sensitive biological product management to pharmaceutical companies, hospitals and organizations with need for validated  GMP storage and temperature-sensitive drug distribution services.  For more information about how Sentry’s GMP storage can help protect the integrity of your biological products in general, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.