Tag Archives: biopharmaceutical

EMA Announces Brexit Business Continuity Plan

In a press release issued on August 1, 2017, The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced that it “has developed and initiated a business continuity plan to deal with the uncertainty and workload implications linked to the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) withdrawal from the European Union (EU) and the Agency’s relocation”. It was indicated the plan is intended to “preserve Agency’s ability to protect public and animal health”.

The plan outlines 3 categories of EMA activities and prioritizes them “according to their impact on public health and the Agency’s ability to function”.

Category 1, the highest priority activities, includes those related to the assessment and safety monitoring of medicines such as actions taken to protect patient safety and inspections across the EU, or activities vital to maintaining the infrastructure and functionality of the EU regulatory system for medicines such as security of critical IT applications. EMA stated, “It is absolutely crucial to uphold these activities as any disruption would almost immediately have a detrimental effect on the health and well being of citizens in Europe and would also jeopardize production and distribution of medicines in the EU”.

Category 2 activities include the proactive publication of clinical data, various initiatives aimed at promoting availability of medicines, and projects such as EMA’s contribution to the fight against antimicrobial resistance or the Agency’s interactions with Health Technology Assessment (HTA) bodies. EMA indicated, “These activities will be maintained for as long as possible, workload and staffing situation permitting, in order to maintain the development of new medicines”.

However, in order to reallocate personnel for preparations for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU and EMA’s relocation, EMA has already begun to suspend activities in what it terms category 3 including:

  • the development of the European Medicines Web Portal, a new publicly-available online information intended to be a single-source for information on all medicines marketed in the EU; 
  • EMA’s contribution to the e-submission project that will allow applicants to electronically submit documents linked to authorization requests for human and veterinary medicines in a secure and efficient way; 
  • the development of a transparency roadmap for EMA that lays out future transparency measures of the Agency; and 
  • participation in the benchmarking of medicines regulatory authorities in the EU as of 2018.”

EMA said it was also reducing the number of audits, some corporate governance and support activities, EMA meetings and workshops, and participation of EMA staff in external meetings or conferences.

EMA said it will consider “how long these activities can be put on hold before they start to seriously undermine the quality of the Agency’s work and its planning, and the expectations of stakeholders”. However, the press release concludes rather ominously stating, “Further iterations of the business continuity plan will also take into account various scenarios for staff losses and how these may affect the delivery of category 1 and 2 activities. Unexpected higher, faster or more permanent loss of staff as a consequence of the Agency’s relocation may lead to a situation in which EMA’s operations can no longer be maintained.”

Source: http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/news_and_events/news/2017/07/news_detail_002789.jsp&mid=WC0b01ac058004d5c1

Sentry BioPharma Services offers temperature sensitive biological product management to pharmaceutical companies, hospitals and organizations with need for validated  GMP storage, labeling, kitting and temperature-sensitive drug distribution services.  For more information about how Sentry’s GMP services can help protect the integrity and delivery of your biological products to patients, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Emergency Preparedness and You

Sentry BioPharma Services provides drug product management, global drug distribution, GMP storage and specialized services like pharmaceutical labeling, packaging and kitting.  Sentry plays a critical role in protecting temperature-sensitive product safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) for both clinical trials and commercial drug distribution for a wide range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients.

Many people are concerned about the possibility of a public health emergency such as a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or disease outbreak. You can take steps now to help you prepare for an emergency and cope if an emergency happens. To help you prepare, we’ve provided step-by-step actions you can take beforehand to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Gather Emergency Supplies

Are you Prepared

If a disaster strikes in your community, you might not have access to food, water, or electricity for several days. You may think that you will have enough time to run to the grocery store, but stores quickly sell out of important supplies following emergency warnings. Unfortunately, about half of adults in the United States do not have the resources and plans in place for a possible emergency. Preparing emergency kits for your family is an important step in keeping them safe and healthy during a disaster.

Pack an emergency supply kit. Here’s what you’ll need:

At Least a 3-day Supply of Food and Water

  • Water – one gallon per person, per day
  • Food – foods that are easy to make and won’t spoil, like canned soup, dry pasta, and powdered milk
  • Manual can opener
  • Basic utensils to prepare and serve meals

Health Supplies

  • 3-day supply of all medicines, at a minimum
  • Medical supplies like syringes, a walking cane, or hearing aids with extra batteries

Personal Care Items

  • Soap
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Baby wipes
  • Contact lenses or glasses

Safety Supplies

  • First aid kit
  • Emergency blanket
  • Multipurpose tool (that can act as a knife, file, pliers, and screwdriver)
  • Whistle

Electronics:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides weather updates during emergencies. Look for a radio labeled “NOAA Weather Radio.”

  • Flashlight
  • Radio (battery-powered, solar, or hand-crank) for updates on the situation
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Extra batteries

Documents

Keep copies of your important documents, cash, spare keys, and maps in your emergency supply kit.

  • Copies of important documents such as insurance cards and immunization records
  • Paperwork about any serious or ongoing medical condition
  • Your completed family emergency plan, complete with family and emergency contact information.

You should also keep

  • Extra cash
  • Maps of the area
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys

Taking Care of Others

You may need additional supplies to make sure the whole family is ready

For Children

  • Baby supplies like bottles, formula, baby food, and diapers
  • Games and activities for children

For Pets

Plan ahead so you’re ready to take care of your pet during an emergency.

  • Food and Water:
    • A 3-day supply of food and water for each pet. A cat or a dog will generally need 1 gallon for three days.
    • Bowls or bottles
    • Manual can opener
  • Cleaning Supplies:
    • Depending on the pet, you may need a litter box, paper towels, plastic trash bags, grooming items, and household bleach.
  • Health and Safety:
    • Medicines and medical records stored in a waterproof container
    • First aid kit with a pet first aid book
  • Transport supplies:
    • A sturdy leash, harness, and carrier to transport pets safely. A carrier should be large enough for the animal to stand comfortably, turn around, and lie down. Your pet may have to stay in the carrier for several hours.
  • Comfort Items:
    • Pet toys and the pet’s bed, if you can easily bring it, to reduce stress.
  • Paperwork:
    • Current photos and descriptions of your pets to help others identify them, and to prove that they are your pets, in case you become separated from them.
    • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and telephone number of your veterinarian in case you have to board your pets or place them in foster care.

Keep these tips in mind!

Check and replace your supplies throughout the year.

Personalize

Every family is unique. You may have emergency needs not included in this list. Also, remember to update your kit according to changing needs of your family.

Be sure it’s ready to use

In a disaster situation, you may need to get your emergency supply kit quickly, whether you are sheltering at home or evacuating.

  • Once you have gathered your supplies, pack the items in easy-to-carry containers.
  • Clearly label the containers and store them where you can reach them easily.
  • Remember that certain items, like medications and paper documents, need to be kept in waterproof containers.

Keep it Fresh

Check the expiration dates on food, water, medicine, and batteries at least two times per year. It’s extremely important that all items in your kit are functional at the time of an emergency.

Involve Children

Families can make emergencies less stressful by preparing in advance and working together as a team. Ask your kids to think of items that they would like to include in an emergency supply kit, such as books, games, and pre-packaged foods.

  • Your kids can mark the dates on a calendar for checking emergency supplies. Tell them to remind you when it’s time to check the supplies.
  • Include kids in planning and creating disaster kits for family pets.

Know Your House

Find out where your gas, electric, and water shut-off locations are, and how to turn them off.

Prepare For Everywhere

Emergencies can happen anywhere. Remember to prepare supplies for home, work, and vehicles.

For more information about how Sentry can help optimize your solutions for biopharmaceutical product storage, distribution, packaging, project management and commercial fulfillment, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

DoD | Human Trials Begin for Army-Developed Zika Vaccine

By Cheryl Pellerin, DoD News, Defense Media Activity / Published Nov. 8, 2016

A clinical trial began yesterday at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, where 75 participating healthy adults were vaccinated with a Zika virus vaccine that the institute’s scientists developed earlier this year, Walter Reed officials announced today.zika

Laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease cases reported to ArboNET by state or territory as of Nov. 2, 2016. ArboNET is a national surveillance system for arthropod-borne virus diseases in the United States, such as those from ticks and mosquitoes.

The Phase 1 trial will test the safety and immunogenicity — the ability of the vaccine to trigger an immune response in the body — of the purified, inactivated Zika virus vaccine called ZPIV. The vaccine is being tested at WRAIR’s Clinical Trial Center in Silver Spring, Maryland.

“The Army has moved efficiently from recognizing Zika virus as a threat, producing ZPIV for use in animals and demonstrating its effectiveness in mice and monkeys, producing ZPIV for human testing, and now initiating clinical trials to establish its safety and build the case for subsequent efficacy trials,” Army Col. (Dr.) Nelson Michael, director of WRAIR’s Military HIV Research Program, or MHRP, and Zika program co-lead, said in a statement.

Efficacy refers to the vaccine’s ability to demonstrate a health effect when tested in a clinical trial.  “All of this,” he added, “was done in 10 months.”

Dr. Kayvon Modjarrad, Zika program co-lead and associate director for emerging infectious disease threats at WRAIR’s MHRP, said the Army was able to move so quickly in developing, manufacturing and testing a Zika vaccine “because of its extensive experience with this vaccine platform and longstanding investments in the understanding and mitigation of flaviviruses like yellow fever, dating back to the founding of WRAIR.”

DoD Zika Response

WRAIR officials say this study is part of the Defense Department response to the ongoing Zika outbreak in North and South America and Southeast Asia.

For service members, there are concerns about infection during deployment and travel, but also in the continental United States, where most military installations are concentrated in southern states. There, climate conditions and mosquito populations favor Zika transmission, WRAIR officials say.mosquito

Zika virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito — Aedes aegypti, shown here, and Aedes albopictus. The same mosquitoes spread dengue and chikungunya viruses. The mosquitoes typically lay eggs in and near standing water in things like buckets, bowls, animal dishes, flower pots and vases. They prefer to bite people and live indoors and outdoors near people. Mosquitoes that spread chikungunya, dengue, and Zika are aggressive daytime biters, but they can also bite at night. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites. CDC photo by James Gathany

As of Nov. 2, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 149 cases of Zika infection were confirmed in the military health system, including four pregnant service members and one pregnant family member.

Zika infection during pregnancy, CDC says, can cause a birth defect of the brain called microcephaly and other severe fetal brain defects.

Other problems have been detected among fetuses and infants infected with Zika virus before birth, such as defects of the eye, hearing deficits and impaired growth. And reports have increased about Guillain-Barré syndrome, an uncommon sickness of the nervous system, in areas affected by Zika, CDC says.

But even Zika infections without symptoms “can lead to severe birth defects and neurological complications,” Zika study principal investigator Army Maj. (Dr.) Leyi Lin said, adding, “A safe and effective Zika vaccine that prevents infection in those at risk is a global public-health priority.”

Zika and Other Flaviviruses

Flaviviruses like Zika are found mainly in mosquitoes and ticks and cause widespread morbidity and mortality worldwide. Other mosquito-transmitted viruses that are members of the flavivirus genus include yellow fever, or YF, dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, or JE, and West Nile viruses, according to the CDC web page.

“We want to assess the safety and immune response of the ZPIV vaccine in JE and yellow fever YF vaccine recipients because these vaccines may alter the response to the ZPIV vaccine,” Lin said.

“Uniquely,” he added, “illness as a result of natural infection from JE, YF or Zika could be more severe when prior flavivirus infection or vaccination exists. Our study assesses co-vaccination to learn how to reduce risk when protecting against circulating flaviviruses.”

This is important for service members who are vaccinated against other flaviviruses and then stationed in or deployed to areas where Zika is becoming endemic, WRAIR scientists say.

Zika Vaccine Platform

WRAIR’s inactivated flavivirus vaccine platform was the same technology the institute used to create its Japanese encephalitis vaccine, licensed in 2009.

An earlier preclinical study found that rhesus monkeys vaccinated with ZPIV developed a strong immune response and were protected against two strains of Zika virus.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, or NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health, helped identify the viral strain used in the ZPIV vaccine, supported the preclinical safety testing and is sponsoring the conduct of this trial.

WRAIR, NIAID and the Department of Health and Human Services’ Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, or BARDA, have established a joint research collaboration agreement to support the vaccine’s development.

The Pilot Bioproduction Facility at WRAIR manufactured the ZPIV vaccine being used in Phase 1 clinical studies, and the Army recently signed a cooperative research and development agreement to transfer the ZPIV technology to Sanofi Pasteur to explore larger-scale manufacturing and advanced development. BARDA recently awarded a six-year contract to Sanofi Pasteur to further develop this vaccine to licensure, according to the WRAIR release.

Other ZPIV Trials

WRAIR’s ZPIV candidate also will soon be part of an NIH trial that began in August. The NIH vaccine contains DNA that instructs volunteers’ cells to make certain Zika proteins that then illicit an immune response. As part of that study, WRAIR’s ZPIV vaccine will be given to volunteers as a booster after they receive the NIH DNA vaccine, WRAIR officials say.

Three more Phase 1 trials using ZPIV are scheduled to begin this year, the WRAIR release noted:

— St. Louis University researchers, through the NIAID-funded Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units network, will examine the optimal dose of the vaccine to be used in larger studies.

— Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School researchers will evaluate the safety and immune response from a compressed vaccine schedule.

— The Ambulatory Center for Medical Research, part of Ponce Health Sciences University in Puerto Rico, will examine the vaccine’s safety and immune response in participants who have already been naturally exposed to Zika or dengue viruses.

The WRAIR trial that began yesterday is sponsored by NIAID and funded by the Army and the Defense Department.

For more information about how Sentry’s proven vaccine management system can protect your vaccine throughout the global supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

For more information: http://www.defense.gov/DesktopModules/ArticleCS/Print.aspx?PortalId=1&ModuleId=753&Article=999584

CDC Report: First cases of Candida auris reported in U.S.

On Friday, November 4, 2016 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the first cases of Candida auris were reported in the United States (U.S.).candida_strain

A strain of Candida auris cultured in a petri dish at CDC.
Photo Credit: Shawn Lockhart, CDC

Thirteen cases of Candida auris (C. auris), a serious and sometimes fatal fungal infection that is emerging globally, have been identified in the United States, according to the CDC. Seven of the cases occurred between May 2013 and August 2016 and are described today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The other six cases were identified after the period covered by the report and are still under investigation.

The following map displays where Candida auris cases have been identified in the United States as of November 4, 2016.

candida

Source of map: https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/candida-auris.html

The report is the first to describe U.S. cases of C. auris infection. C. auris is often resistant to antifungal drugs and tends to occur in hospitalized patients. In June 2016, CDC issued a clinical alert describing the global emergence of C. auris and requesting that laboratories report C. auris cases and send patient samples to state and local health departments and CDC. Since then, CDC has been investigating reports of C. auris with several state and local health departments. The agency expects to continue to investigate possible cases as awareness of the emerging infection increases.

“We need to act now to better understand, contain and stop the spread of this drug-resistant fungus,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “This is an emerging threat, and we need to protect vulnerable patients and others.”

Among the seven cases detailed in the report, patients with C. auris were reported in four states: New York, Illinois, Maryland and New Jersey. All of the patients had serious underlying medical conditions and had been hospitalized an average of 18 days when C. auris was identified. Four of the patients died; it is unclear whether the deaths were associated with C. auris infection or underlying health conditions.

In two instances, two patients had been treated in the same hospital or long-term-care facility and had nearly identical fungal strains. These findings suggest that C. auris could be spread in healthcare settings.

Six of the seven cases were identified through retrospective review of hospital and reference laboratory records. Identifying C. auris requires specialized laboratory methods because it can easily be misidentified as another type of Candida infection, in which case patients may not receive appropriate treatment. Most of the patient samples in the current report were initially misidentified as another species of Candida.

Most of the C. auris strains from U.S. patients (71 percent) showed some drug resistance, making treatment more difficult. Samples of C. auris strains from other countries have been found to be resistant to all three major classes of antifungal medications. However, none of the U.S. strains in this report were resistant to all three antifungal drug classes. Based on laboratory testing, the U.S. strains were found to be related to strains from South Asia and South America. However, none of the patients travelled to or had any direct links to those regions. Most patients likely acquired the infections locally.

“It appears that C. auris arrived in the United States only in the past few years,” said Tom Chiller, M.D., M.P.H., chief of CDC’s Mycotic Diseases Branch. “We’re working hard with partners to better understand this fungus and how it spreads so we can improve infection control recommendations and help protect people.”

CDC recommends that healthcare professionals implement strict Standard and Contact Precautions to control the spread of C. auris. Facilities should conduct thorough daily and after-discharge cleaning of rooms of C. auris patients with an EPA-registered disinfectant active against fungi. Any cases of C. auris should be reported to CDC and state and local health departments. CDC can assist in identifying this particular type of Candida if needed.

In 2013, CDC issued a report describing antibiotic resistance threats in the United States that needed prompt action, including Candida infections. CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Laboratory Network is providing additional lab support in four regional laboratories to test fungal susceptibility of Candida species and identify emerging resistance. CDC is also expanding tracking of this fungus through the Emerging Infections Program. Information gathered through these networks plays a key role in tracking resistance and informing policies and interventions.

The challenge of emerging antibiotic resistant threats like C. auris highlights the need for urgent, coordinated federal, state, local, and international public health response and the importance of CDC’s AR Solutions Initiative. The timely investments in the AR Solutions Initiative empower CDC to rapidly detect, investigate, and respond to emerging threats, like C. auris; prevent resistant infections from occurring and spreading across healthcare settings and the community; and innovate, supporting development of new diagnostics and drugs to test, treat, prevent infections, and save lives.

For more information about how Sentry can implement a custom solution to meet your unique pharmaceutical supply chain challenges, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400, for a complimentary, no obligation phone call with one of Sentry’s problem-solving experts.

For more information: https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/candida-auris.html

Features & Benefits of Sentry’s Pharmaceutical Labeling & Packaging Services

Sentry BioPharma Services specializes in pharmaceutical and medical device packaging projects of varying scale, complexity and sensitivity to time and temperature. Sentry’s  full service light manufacturing through Food & Drug Administration (FDA) compliant pharmaceutical labeling and custom kitting functions provide clients the ability to store bulk products yet deliver kitted solutions to clinical sites and commercial customers across the global. This one-stop shop structure married with Sentry’s Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) offers optimal flexibility and cost effective solutions to even the most intricate of drug development projects.

sentry-lp-photo-1

Sentry Labeling and Packaging

Features of Sentry’s Pharmaceutical Labeling and Packaging Solutions 

GMP operation compliant with FDA regulations

o    FDA labeler code (3007066137)

o    Segregated labeling and packaging area

o    Total label operation accountability (line clearance)

 

Diverse Clinical Trial Labeling & Packaging Support

o    Open and blinded

o    Multi-lingual

o    Peel-off / Perforated

o    Serialized

 

Pharmaceutical & Medical Device Packaging

o    Bulk

o    Double-blind

o    Package inserts

o    Single / Multi-dose cartons

o    Tamper evident seals

On-Demand Services

o    Configurable stock management

o    Expiration management of individual kit components

o    Extend expiration

o    Pharmaceutical kitting

o    Reduce at-risk inventory

 

Adaptable Scheduling

o    Batch or lot specific

o    Batch size

 

Benefits of Sentry’s Pharmaceutical Labeling and Packaging Solutions 

Streamlined Production throughout Drug Development Phases – Avoid cumbersome logistics among vendors with Sentry’s full scope services from GMP pharmaceutical storage, biopharmaceutical labeling and packaging and extensive distribution.

Accurate Inventory Control from Bulk to Finish –  Sentry’s compliant, validated inventory management system and batch record process allow for accurate tracking of inventory levels during clinical trials and commercial launch.

Cost Effective Manufacture – Reduce pharmaceutical drug development costs with Sentry’s flexible storage, labeling and packaging offerings before, during and after FDA approval.

For more information about how a coordinated GMP storage, packaging and distribution model may reduce risk and strengthen the structure of your supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

FDA Announces Meeting on Implementing DSCSA’s Product Identification Requirements

Sentry BioPharma Services continues to strengthen its leadership position in providing high quality and secure pharmaceutical supply chain services to pharmaceutical clients and companies utilizing biotechnology to manufacture biological products and vaccines.  Therefore, we would like to draw attention to an upcoming public meeting concerning the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) hosted by the FDA.

fda-dscsaThe Food & Drug Administration (FDA) will be holding a public meeting to provide members of the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain and interested stakeholders an opportunity to discuss with FDA the implementation of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act’s (DSCSA’s) product identification requirements. To be held on October 14, 2016, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at FDA’s White Oak Campus in Silver Spring, MD, the meeting, “Progress Toward Implementing the Product Identification Requirements of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act,” will include presentations from the public and follow-up questions from an FDA panel. The objective of the meeting is to discuss the pharmaceutical supply chain’s progress toward implementing the DSCSA’s product identification requirements, including best practices in each sector of the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain to conduct product tracing, verification, and identification.

More Background on the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA)

Title II of the Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013

The Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), was signed into law by President Obama on November 27, 2013. Title II of DQSA, the Drug Supply Chain Security Act, outlines critical steps to build an electronic, interoperable system to identify and trace certain prescription drugs as they are distributed in the United States.

Ten years after enactment, the system will facilitate the exchange of information at the individual package level about where a drug has been in the supply chain. The new system will:

  • enable verification of the legitimacy of the drug product identifier down to the package level;
  • enhance detection and notification of illegitimate products in the drug supply chain; and
  • facilitate more efficient recalls of drug products.

Drug manufacturers, wholesale drug distributors, repackagers, and many dispensers (primarily pharmacies) will be called on to work in cooperation with FDA to develop the new system over the next 10 years.

Among key provisions implemented over the next 10 years are requirements for:

  • Product identification: Manufacturers and repackagers to put a unique product identifier on certain prescription drug packages, for example, using a bar code that can be easily read electronically.
  • Product tracing: Manufacturers, wholesaler drug distributors, repackagers, and many dispensers (primarily pharmacies) in the drug supply chain to provide information about a drug and who handled it each time it is sold in the U.S. market.
  • Product verification: Manufacturers, wholesaler drug distributors, repackagers, and many dispensers (primarily pharmacies) to establish systems and processes to be able to verify the product identifier on certain prescription drug packages.
  • Detection and response: Manufacturers, wholesaler drug distributors, repackagers, and many dispensers (primarily pharmacies) to quarantine and promptly investigate a drug that has been identified as suspect, meaning that it may be counterfeit, unapproved, or potentially dangerous.
  • Notification: Manufacturers, wholesaler drug distributors, repackagers, and many dispensers (primarily pharmacies) to establish systems and processes to notify FDA and other stakeholders if an illegitimate drug is found.
  • Wholesaler licensing: Wholesale drug distributors to report their licensing status and contact information to FDA. This information will then be made available in a public database.
  • Third-party logistics provider licensing: Third-party logistic providers, those who provide storage and logistical operations related to drug distribution, to obtain a state or federal license.

The law requires FDA to develop standards, guidance documents, and pilot programs and to conduct public meetings, in addition to other efforts necessary to support efficient and effective implementation. FDA is developing a schedule for implementing the law’s requirements.

This system will enhance the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s ability to help protect consumers from exposure to drugs that may be counterfeit, stolen, contaminated, or otherwise harmful. The system will improve detection and removal of potentially dangerous drugs from the drug supply chain to protect U.S. consumers. Failure to comply with the requirements of the law can result in penalties.

The development of the system will be phased in with new requirements over a 10-year period. These requirements will include providing product and transaction information at each sale with lot level information, in paper or electronic format, and placing unique product identifiers on individual drug packages.

The FDA is soliciting either electronic or written comments related to this public meeting by November 14, 2016. To register or request to make a presentation, visit the public meeting web page.

For more information about how Sentry’s secure drug supply chain management programs can ensure drug product integrity in every phase of the pharmaceutical supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Sentry Visits Biotech Clients in the Pacific Northwest to Discuss API Importation and FTZ Benefits

Sentry recently completed a week-long trip to the Pacific Northwest region to satisfy multiple requests to learn more about the company’s foreign trade zone (FTZ) service offering.  Client interest focused on importing high value active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into Sentry’s FTZ for an indefinite storage term.

As supply chains become more intricate in our ever shrinking world, any weak link that chain can produce devastating results for temperature-sensitive biotech drug products.  “Most of us in pharma and biotech have our stories of disasters or near calamities concerning product movements globally” stated Tim Mitchell, President of Sentry.  “In light of the tremendous investment in treasury and time required to bring a new medication to market, it is critical to not allow product safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) to be impacted by delays which are inherent with the standard drug importation process.”

Sentry can help prevent time-out-of-temperature excursions through the utilization of its Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ), subzone 11 of zone 72 located at its facility in Indianapolis, Indiana.

What is a Foreign Trade Zone?ftza

The U.S. Foreign Trade Zone program was established by the Foreign Trade Zone Act of 1934 to “expedite and encourage foreign commerce” in the United States. Certain geographical areas, in or adjacent to Customs Ports of Entry, can obtain foreign trade zone (FTZ) status and receive commercial merchandise under the same Customs standards as if it were outside the commerce of the United States. Any merchandise, including pharmaceutical products, admitted and held in a foreign trade zone can be exempt of any Customs duties, tariffs and other ad valorem taxes. No duty or back taxes are charged on “value-added,” or foreign-sourced parts or materials incorporated into a finished product using U.S. parts and labor until the product is officially imported into the U.S. Commerce. This tariff and tax relief lowers the costs of U.S.-based organizations engaged in international trade while creating and retaining employment and capital investment opportunities that result from those operations.

Benefits to the Biopharmaceutical Industry

Pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies can take advantage of Sentry’s GMP temperature-sensitive pharmaceutical storage and light manufacturing facility, which resides in a foreign trade zone.  Sentry’s FTZ allows drug product to reside within the product’s designated temperature range, (such as API, biologics, controlled substances, etc.), while awaiting clearance for importation by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency (CBP) and approved for distribution by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA).

During its stay in the FTZ, the biopharmaceutical product can be further labeled and secondarily packaged while greatly mitigating the numerous logistic and economic challenges encountered throughout the drug importation and development process.

Logistic Benefits 

Unlimited Storage Terms Term of pharmaceutical material storage in an FTZ is indefinite.
Eliminated U.S. Quota Restrictions Product previously subject to quota limitations is now exempt from such restrictions.
Strengthened Foreign Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Eliminate administrative and importation hold-ups at Customs and ports of entry by bringing product straight to our GMP pharmaceutical storage environments ensuring product integrity: safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) along the drug supply chain.
Uninterrupted Local Manufacture Prior to Importation Product can be labelled, kitted and packaged and stored in the United States until need for importation into U.S. Commerce and Customs Clearance.
Expedited Release to Market Product can be held in an FTZ until FDA approval, greatly reducing time and logistic hassle from manufacturer to end-user.

Economic Benefits 

Duty Deferral or Duty Aversion  Import, admit and hold product without paying U.S. Customs duties.
Zero Inventory Taxes All materials held in an FTZ are exempt from state, county and local ad valorem taxes.
Country of Origin Marking and Labeling Country-of-origin labels are non-required on product admitted to an FTZ freeing companies from this expense.

Sentry BioPharma Services’ pharmaceutical supply chain management expertise and FTZ status across all storage environments ensures product integrity and project management flexibility.

For more information about how Sentry’s Foreign Trade Zone can help you optimize your medical and pharmaceutical import/export process, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Sentry’s Controlled Substance Program Strengthens the Reliable and Secure Pharmaceutical Drug Supply Chain

Regulatory oversight shapes every dimension of controlled substances: licensing, registration, storage, security, use, inventory and controlled drug disposal. Finding a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) licensed partner to store, distribute and manage returns and destruction of Schedule III-V controlled substances while maintaining regulatory and quality standards required for a secure pharmaceutical supply chain can be a challenge. Sentry BioPharma Services provides seamless product management required to safeguard controlled substances which are brought into Sentry’s custody and care.

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Features & Benefits of Sentry’s Controlled Substance Program

DEA Regulation Secure Storage – Inspected and approved by the Drug Enforcement Administration  in 2014, Sentry’s state-of-the-art controlled substance capacity provides secure and reliable storage to support your pharmaceutical supply chain needs.

Controlled Substance Importation/Exportation – Sentry’s controlled substance importation and controlled substance exportation capabilities provide pharmaceutical organizations unique flexibility in the drug supply chain. This coupled with Sentry’s high quality standards affords pharmaceutical companies a competitive advantage throughout the drug development process.

Redundant Systems and Extensive Security Measures Product safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) remain intact.  Sentry features which support this agenda include:

  • Auxiliary power feeds and back-up systems
  • Continuous (24/7) security monitoring
  • Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) status which allows controlled substances to be internationally shipped directly to Sentry where DEA, Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) and FDA clearances can be obtained within the security provided by Sentry’s GMP facility
  • Physical plant security
  • Redundant HVAC systems
  • Secure data and document programs

Pharmaceutical Labeling and Packaging – Sentry’s light pharmaceutical manufacturing capabilities help streamline clinical trial distribution and commercial drug distribution with one stop shop GMP labeling and GMP secondary packaging.

Drug Product Return and Drug Disposal Services – Sentry completes the controlled substance supply chain with a full-service approach to product guardianship.  Our drug product return and drug destruction program ensures project integrity, reliable inventory tracking and public safety from development to launch.

For more information about how Sentry can provide controlled substance supply chain solutions for your project, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Features & Benefits of a Pharmaceutical Foreign Trade Zone

What is a Foreign Trade Zone?

The U.S. Foreign Trade Zone program was established by the Foreign Trade Zone Act of 1934 to “expedite and encourage foreign commerce” in the United States. Certain geographical areas, in or adjacent to Customs Ports of Entry, can obtain foreign-trade zone (FTZ) status and receive commercial merchandise under the same Customs standards as if it were outside the commerce of the United States. Any merchandise, including pharmaceutical products, admitted and held in a foreign trade zone can be exempt of any Customs duties, tariffs and other ad valorem taxes. No duty or back taxes are charged on “value-added,” or foreign-sourced parts or materials incorporated into a finished product using U.S. parts and labor until the product is officially imported into the U.S. Commerce. This tariff and tax relief lowers the costs of U.S.-based organizations engaged in international trade while creating and retaining employment and capital investment opportunities that result from those operations.

Benefits to the Biopharmaceutical Industryshutterstock_367703690

Pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies can take advantage of Sentry’s GMP temperature-sensitive pharmaceutical storage and light manufacturing facility, which  resides in a foreign trade zone.  Sentry’s zone allows drug product to reside within the product’s designated temperature range, (such as API, biologics, controlled substances, etc.), while awaiting clearance for importation by the CBP and approved for distribution by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA).

During its stay in the FTZ, the biopharmaceutical  product can be further labeled and secondarily packaged  while greatly mitigating the numerous logistic and economic challenges encountered throughout the  drug importation and development process.

Logistic Benefits 

Unlimited Storage Terms Term of pharmaceutical material storage in an FTZ is indefinite.
Eliminated U.S. Quota Restrictions Product previously subject to quota limitations is now exempt from such restrictions.
Strengthened Foreign Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Eliminate administrative and importation hold-ups at Customs and ports of entry by bringing product straight to our GMP pharmaceutical storage environments ensuring product integrity: safety, identity, strength, purity and quality (SISPQ) along the drug supply chain.
Uninterrupted Local Manufacture Prior to Importation Product can be labelled, kitted and packaged and stored in the United States until need for importation into U.S. Commerce and Customs Clearance.
Expedited Release to Market Product can be held in an FTZ until FDA approval, greatly reducing time and logistic hassle from manufacturer to end-user.

Economic Benefits 

Duty Deferral or Duty Aversion  Import, admit and hold product without paying U.S. Customs duties.
Zero Inventory Taxes All materials held in an FTZ are exempt from state, county and local ad valorem taxes.
Country of Origin Marking and Labeling Country-of-origin labels are non-required on product admitted to an FTZ freeing companies from this expense.

Sentry BioPharma Services’ pharmaceutical supply chain management expertise and FTZ status across all storage environments ensures product integrity and project management flexibility.

For more information about how Sentry’s Foreign Trade Zone can help you optimize your medical and pharmaceutical import/export process, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Read more about the Greater Indianapolis Foreign Trade Zone: inzone.org

Operation Silver Snake Sets CBP Field Operations Seizure Record in San Juan, Puerto Rico

Last month, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) San Juan Field Operations announced that approximately 268 seizures were made of counterfeit products, valued at $2.4 million, which were illegally imported into Puerto Rico via international mail.  This is a record number of counterfeits seized by CBP in Puerto Rico during a single week.

A wide range of counterfeited products was seized during the week-long enforcement effort, called Operation Silver Snake, to include: consumer products, apparel, footwear, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and more.

CBP Operation SS (1)

International Mail packages are inspected by CBP to verify compliance with US laws

This is the second iteration of a week-long operation carried out in San Juan this year by the Mobile Intellectual Property Enforcement Team (MIPET), with the support of CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEEs), IPR-National Targeting & Analysis Group (NTAG), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS).

“Our dedicated CBP officers, Import Specialist, International Trade Specialists and Seized Property Specialists were key ingredients to this successful enforcement effort to protect the U.S. economy and consumers from counterfeit products,” said Edward Ryan, Assistant Director of Trade for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. “We are looking forward to conducting follow-up operations with our partners to further protect legitimate businesses and consumers from intellectual property thieves, said Ryan.

Various international mail packages inspected by CBP officers at the San Juan International Mail Branch revealed products that infringed intellectual property rights.  The products were shipped from vendors in China.

CBP protects businesses and consumers every day through an aggressive intellectual property rights (IPR) enforcement program.  CBP targets and seizes imports of counterfeit and pirated goods, and enforces exclusion orders on patent-infringing and other IPR goods.

CBP Operation SS (2)

CBP Officers label counterfeit products seized during the operation.

To effectively enforce intellectual property rights, CBP relies heavily on the cooperation of the owners of these rights. If your intellectual property is registered with the Patent and Trademark Office, the Copyright Office or the subject of a United States International Trade Commission exclusion order, you will want to inform CBP.

Information about counterfeit merchandise being illegally imported into the United States can be submitted to the CBP using an on-line tool called E-Allegation.  The e-Allegation provides a means for the public to anonymously report to CBP any suspected violations of trade laws or regulations related to the importation of goods into the U.S.

For more information about how Sentry’s import/export team can add value to your international supply chain, contact Sentry via email or by phone at 1-866-757-7400.

Source: https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/local-media-release/2016-07-20-000000/cbp-stops-millions-unsafe-counterfeits